Use this method regularly when training with weights

Photo by Alora Griffiths on Unsplash

Are you more interested in building strength than size?

I would say that both are pretty important regarding the overall package. To have one without the other would create an imbalanced body.

For example, I recently had an operation in February that prohibited me from lifting weights.

As soon as I could start, I became ill with the flu. That also set me back.

As I have trained consistently for several weeks, my strength has somewhat lowered more than I had anticipated.

Although I’m aware it takes time and effort — the realisation of my inconsistent training has put a dent in my confidence.

Even if you have a fair amount of size, you might be putting a significant stall in your progression if you don’t have the strength and stamina.

Our nervous system needs a fair bit of training to activate our strength.

Research indicates that loading up the bar has more of an impact on our nervous system.

High loads condition the nervous system better to transmit electrical signals from the brain to muscles, increasing the force those muscles can produce to a greater extent than that of lower loading.

Muscles contract when they receive those electrical signals in the brain’s neuron-rich motor cortex.

Those signals come from the cortex to the spinal tract, speeding through the spine while jumping to the motor neurons that ignite muscle fibres.

Just imagine all the complexities of nervous system activation that follow through into our muscle fibres.

So, the real deal is if you want to make the most significant strength impacts through lifting weights — you must lift heavier loads.

These findings were demonstrated in 26 men who trained for six weeks on a leg extension machine loaded with either 30 or 80 per cent of the max weight they could lift.

The training was conducted three times per week and lifted until failure occurred.

Muscle growth between the two groups was similar, but the more extensive loading produced a more significant strength increase.

It was about ten pounds worth of growth.

This is fantastic news for anyone seeking to build muscle mass and strength.

Research shows that you don’t have to lift lighter weights at a higher rep range.

However, loading up the bar a lot more kills two birds with one stone. Add more muscle mass, and build up strength as a result!

High-load training is much more efficient, especially if you seek faster results.

Think of your progress by just focusing on lifting heavier weights during each session.

More remarkable strength adaptations mean you will be able to build upon your personal best.

Key takeaways

So, if you would like to gain strength and size, go ahead and lift heavy.

However, the gains in muscle mass are pretty similar, and if you want to make more of an impact, why not train with both heavy and lighter loads.

Using both methods is the best way to ensure you are working both mediums of strength and size.

But, if you are time-poor or in a bit of a hurry to build strength faster — use the heavier load method.

Over time, you will make more of an impact anyway — because the stronger you are, the more weight you can lift and the more muscle growth become possible.

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Source:https://medium.com/


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